About the unit/ Where this unit fits
This unit takes place in the first term of 2nd ESO in the subject Social Studies. The students are learning about Medieval Ages focusing on Spain and Europe and the changes characteristics of these centuries in politics, economy, society and culture. Working together with the English department, the unit will reinforce the past tense, passive tense, and how to name the different centuries and dates.

The skills: learning strategies and procedures that are going to be developed are: a chronology timeline, understand and make graphics and maps, draw and report conclusions, ITC.

Procedures: analysing pictures, dates, texts, maps and timelines; using a specific vocabulary, making an hierarchy estate pyramid, interpreting different information and relating it with studied concepts, using information on a website.

Attitudes: showing comprehension about preserving medieval legacy, critical attitude towards hierarchy in any society, curiosity to learn about other stages, showing interest in schoolwork.

Linguistic communication: vocabulary related to Middle Ages, correct explanation and expression about characteristics of medieval times, understanding oral and written information.

Mathematical competence: making timelines with Feudalism’s development, interpreting graphs.

Learning to learn: using information from different resources, relating the learnt concepts with daily life.

Digital competence: using computers to look for information, to study vocabulary, to do activities and to play with it.
Interpersonal and civic competence: showing tolerance towards other people’ opinions, working with classmates, respecting other people believes and thoughts.

Autonomy and personal initiative: being able to solve activities successfully, working with different resources.

Knowledge and interacting with our world: comparing different societies and cultures, understanding the important of Middle Ages in Europe’s heritage.

Cultural and artistic expression: interpreting illustrations.

Final talk: Student will elaborate little tasks during every session to understand and learn the Middle Ages in order to make a final assessment which will be the creation of a poster about the life during these centuries. In this poster will appear the task they have been making during the different sessions and finally, every student will write a little report about their life being a: king, lord, knight, clergyman, city citizen or a peasant.
Prior Learning
Language used in the unit
Important Resources
Last year, students learnt in Social Studies about Prehistory and Antiquity, including Ancient Greece and Rome. In this academic year, they will learn about Middle Ages (Early, High and Late Middle Ages) to Early Modern.
In this unit, we are going to learn historical events, habits and vocabulary related to the Middle Ages period in Europe and Spain. Literacy speaking, we are going to focus in the different English past tenses and passive tense, and how to name the different centuries and dates.
The vocabulary they will learn is: Late Roman Empire, Early Middle Ages, High Middle Ages, Late Middle Ages, Western Christianity, Byzantium Empire, Islam, Barbarians or Germanic people, Merovingian, Carolingian, Muslims, Emperor, Pope, feudalism, protection, loyalty, hierarchy, vassal, knight, fief, king, peasant, oath of Fealty, clergyman, castle, monk.
Maps, pictures, magazines, news, textbooks and the internet and made by the teacher himself/herself.
Expectations
At the end of this unit all the children must
• recognize the three epochs: Early, High and Late Middle Ages; and their general characteristics.
• understand the term feudalism and the principles where the feudal regime lies on.
• know the Early Middle Ages society hierarchy.

• distinguish the main political institutions in High Middle Ages.
• understand the economic development in High Middle Ages.
• recognize the Late Middle Ages crisis in its different fields.
• understand the role of Christianity in Middle Ages.
At the end of this unit most of the children should
• understand the personal and judicial relationships in the Middle Ages.
• interpret a historical graphic: the feudal pyramid of population.
• explain what caused the birth of this new political, economical and social system.
• understand the hierarchical organization within the Church.
• explain the lifestyle of medieval peasants.
• establish a relation between the artistic styles and the mentality of the society.
At the end of this unit some of the children could
• feel empathy for the peasants in this unfair society.
• appreciate the European societies’ efforts to overcome the recession.
• recognize some elements that are alive nowadays and they come from feudal Europe.





Lessons Overview
Lesson
Learning goals
Learning outcomes
Main activity
Assessment criteria
1
Students should recognize the three epochs within the Middle Ages: Early, High and Late Middle Ages; and their general characteristics.
Students will be able to divide the Middle Ages in these three periods using the right chronology.
Define concepts as: Early, High and Late Middle Ages.
Teacher assessment of the chronology time line dividing it in three periods and explaining the main events which happened in each moment.
2
Students will be able to learn what feudalism was and how medieval society was organised and divided in three groups.
Students will be able to explain the origins of feudalism and how it worked. They will enumerate the three estates of medieval society and they will be able to understand the hierarchy of it.
Students will draw a population pyramid and after that they will write an interpretation of it thinking about the privileges, duties, work and social status in Middle Ages.
Peer assessment of the pyramid which shows the feudal hierarchy and teacher assessment of the pyramid interpretation.
3
Students will be able to learn the different kind of jobs carry out by the: bellatores, oratores and laboratores.
Students will be able to express the lifestyles and the characteristics of the three medieval estates, knights, clergymen and peasants.
Students will be divided in groups and its group will have to represent their lives in the Medieval Ages as if they were from one of the three medieval estates.
Teacher assessment of their oral and written productions of the students’ lives as members of the estates.
Listening assessment when asking other members of the class about their classmates descriptions.
4
Students will be able to learn how and why medieval cities, their economy and a new social class called bourgeoisie.
Students will be able to explain the causes of urban growth and the development of local (and the role of guilds) and international trade (and its trade routes).
To explain local trade, students will draw a pyramid showing the internal structure of a guild. To explain international trade, students will draw a map of Europe including all the trade routes between the different countries.
To understand the role of craftsmen and their importance within the city, they have to collect all the street names in their city which are linked to one of these guilds.
Peer assessment of the guilds pyramid, the list of streets names linked to guilds and maps produced by the students.
5
Students will be able to learn the medieval political institutions within Europe.
Students will be able to understand the two most important European political institutions: Papacy and the Empire; and, the local institutions.
Students will make a conceptual map about the political and religious institutions in the Middle Ages.
Teacher assessment of the structure of their conceptual map and their answers.
6
Students will be able to learn the greatest crisis in Middle Ages in 14th century: religious, political, social and demography crisis.
Students will be able to explain the reasons that caused the 14th century’s crisis.
Students will make a summary about the causes of the crisis and they will comment a fragment of Giovanni Boccaccio’s Decameron.
Peer assessment of the list of causes of 14th century’s medieval crisis. Teacher assessment of the comment of Boccaccio’s Decameron.

Lesson 1

Learning objectives
Learning outcomes
Evidence for Assessment
Students should recognize the three epochs within the Middle Ages: Early, High and Late Middle Ages; and their general characteristics.
Students will be able to divide the Middle Ages in these three periods using the right chronology.
Classroom observation.
Notebooks.
Chronology timeline draw.
Discourse/Text targeted
Language targeted- Non-verbal L Targeted
Vocabulary: Late Roman Empire, Early Middle Ages, High Middle Ages, Late Middle Ages, Western Christianity, Byzantium Empire, Islam, Barbarians or Germanic people, Merovingian, Carolingian, Muslims, Emperor, Pope.
Verbal tenses: past simple, past perfect, passive.
Structures: cardinal and ordinal numbers. How to say years and centuries.
Body gestures to make understand the vocabulary and the actions.
Visual resources: images, maps, paintings, photographs.
Explanatory and instructive language.
Outline of leading activities
The teacher will ask questions about Middle Ages, with the help of some posters and images, and the students will review some vocabulary about it. The teacher will explain what they are going to learn in this unit. Then, the teacher will explain the division of the period in History and the students will elaborate a chronology time line and will locate some important events and typical characteristics of these three periods.
Classroom Management
Timing
Grouping
Pupils
Teacher
Resources
1’
Whole class
Talk about how they feel.
“Good morning everybody, how are you today? Are you feeling good? Great! Then, let’s get started with our new unit called: Middle Ages.”

10’
Whole class
Students raise their hands if they want to participate in the discussion. They answer the questions checking their background knowledge, thinking about movies they might have seen or about things they have heard to an older brother or in a cultural trip, etc.
Ask: What do you imagine when you hear the words “Middle Ages”? Do you know how important was religion was at that time? If you have to think about a medieval building, which one would it be? Do you know what a “fief” is? How could you get one? Do you know the role of the fief’s owner in the Middle Ages? What other social classes there were in these centuries? What centuries are these?
Explain what students are going to learn in this unit.
Textbook, introductory page to the unit. Images of castles, knights, etc…
Posters with the new vocabulary and their pictures included.
10’
Whole class
Observe and ask.
Explain the three periods during Middle Ages centuries and explain the most characteristic events and lifestyles of those moments. Emphasise that this division doesn’t apply to all geographical areas or appear at the same time or with the same name.
Blackboard, map of the Mediterranean area. Timeline of Islam and Byzantium societies.
10’
Pair work
Observe and ask.
Draw a chronology timeline and locate the centuries that correspond to these three periods.
Explain what a chronology timeline is, write on the blackboard the medieval divisions of Western Europe and ask students to build a time line themselves.
Observe and guide. Check.
Students’ notebooks.
10’
Individual work
Read from the book the chapter about the Early Middle Ages in Western Europe: “Christian Europe from 6th to 10th centuries”
Observe and guide.
Explain the events students have just read.
Textbook.
15’
Group work
Every group has to make a short presentation about one aspect from the chapter they have just read. A group will talk about the Byzantine Empire, another about the Frankish Kingdom; the third one about the Carolingian Empire and the last one about the decadence its empire.
Observe and guide.
Students’ notebooks.
Assessment Criteria
All children must be able to
• Learn the chronology of the Middle Ages and its internal division that applies to Western Europe.
Most of the children will be able to
• Understand that Middle Ages have different divisions depending on the geographical and civilization that are studied.
Some of the children could
• Remember the chronological divisions in the Byzantium and Islam Empires.













Lesson 2

Learning objectives
Learning outcomes
Evidence for Assessment
Students will be able to learn what feudalism was and how medieval society was organised and divided in three groups.
Students will be able to explain the origins of feudalism and enumerate the three estates of medieval society and their more important characteristics.
Classroom observation.
Notebooks.
Feudal pyramid picture.
Discourse/Text targeted
Language targeted- Non-verbal L Targeted
Vocabulary: Feudalism, protection, loyalty, hierarchy, vassal, knight, fief, king, peasant, oath of Fealty, clergyman, castle, monk.
Verbal tenses: past simple, past perfect, passive.
Structures: cardinal and ordinal numbers. How to say years and centuries.
Body gestures to make understand the vocabulary and the actions.
Visual resources: images, maps, paintings, photographs.
Explanatory and instructive language.
Outline of leading activities
The teacher will write and explain the new vocabulary on the blackboard and will also write the website where students will practise with activities and games the vocabulary they are going to learn. Later, the student will read the textbook’s pages where it is explained how the society in Middle Ages was; and they will watch a video also about it. After that, students will be able to build a pyramid showing the rigid medieval social hierarchy.
Classroom Management
Timing
Grouping
Pupils
Teacher
Resources
1’
Whole class
Talk about how they feel.
“Good morning everybody, how are you today? Are you feeling good? Today we are going to continue learning about
Middle Ages!”

10’
Pair work
Students will be in the computer lab and they will work with the meaning of the new vocabulary through the use of flashcards. They will also practise the listening and the spelling; and they will be able to test their learning.
Observe and help students to figure out the meaning of the new vocabulary understanding the definitions.
http://quizlet.com/7626896/rise-of-feudalism-vocabulary-flash-cards/
10’
Pair work
Students will play with the new vocabulary: matching the words with their meaning and writing the correct word for each meaning as if was a competition.
Observe and guide.
http://quizlet.com/7626896/rise-of-feudalism-vocabulary-flash-cards/
10’
Whole class
Read the two pages of the book where the Feudalism is explained.
Observe and guide.
Textbook.
5’
Whole class
Listen and take notes.
Teacher explains and gives an example of a hierarchic pyramid, the catholic church in the Middle Ages.
Blackboard.
14’
Whole class
Watch video about feudalism and take notes. Ask if needed.
Play the video and stop it in order to explain what in the video may be not clear for the students.
Wikispace.
10’
Individual work
Having the figure of a triangle drawn in their notebooks they have to place in it the different social estates in the feudal society.
Observe, guide and check.
Textbook, notebook, video, blackboard and flashcards.
Assessment Criteria
All children must be able to
• Define and explain what feudalism, its origin and its characteristics.
•Draw the pyramid of the medieval society understanding the rigid structure of it.
Most of the children will be able to
• Understand the privileges, duties, kind of work of the people during the Middle Ages depending on their social place of birth.
Some of the children could
• Remember what it implies having an oath of Fealty.

















Lesson 3

Learning objectives
Learning outcomes
Evidence for Assessment
Students will be able to learn the different kind of jobs carry out by the: bellatores, oratores and laboratores.
Students will be able to express the lifestyles and the characteristics of the three medieval estates, knights, clergymen and peasants.
Classroom observation.
Notebooks.
Description of the duties and work of the three social orders.
Discourse/Text targeted
Language targeted- Non-verbal L Targeted
Vocabulary: medieval society, three orders: nobility (bellatores), clergy (oratores) and peasantry (laboratores); medieval lord rights and privileges, hereditary fief, jurisdictional rights, monopoly, tithe, bishop, diocesan bishop, monks, parcel, lord assistance, freemen, villains, taxation, mortality, to leave the land fallow.
Verbal tenses: past simple, past perfect, passive.
Structures: cardinal and ordinal numbers. How to say years and centuries.
Body gestures to make understand the vocabulary and the actions.
Visual resources: images, maps, paintings, photographs.
Explanatory and instructive language.
Outline of leading activities
Continuing with the second session, students will learn today more specifically about the social medieval hierarchy, the duties, the privileges and the lifestyles of these social orders. In order to do that, students will read the textbook and watch some selected scenes of four videos. After that, students will have a play role game. The class will become a medieval village and every pair of student will get a card with an assigned social order. In that card they will write their duties/privileges/characteristics, and after that they will perform the activities of their daily life.
Classroom Management
Timing
Grouping
Pupils
Teacher
Resources
1’
Whole class
Talk about how they feel.
“Good morning everybody, how are you? Let’s continue with this exciting unit!”

8’
Whole class
Read the pages of the book which talk about this matter and ask questions if need it.
Observe and guide.
Textbook.
30’
Whole class
Watch selected parts of the videos from the wiki space (“The King”, “the Knight”, “the Monk” and “the Peasant”) take notes and ask questions.
Play the selected scenes and explain what it is not clear.
Videos from the teacher’s wiki space.
1’
Whole class
Play role 1: students decide where to set the areas assigned to each medieval social order: Castle, abbey/church and village.
Explain the activity and set the three areas in the class as students suggest.
Material prepared by the teacher.
10’
Pair work
Play role 2: every two students get a card with the social group where they belong. They have to write the duties, privileges and characteristics of the level assigned in the card.
Explain, observe and guide.
Material prepared by the teacher.
10’
Whole class
Play role 3: the class becomes a feudal village and every couple has to perfume the work or activity of their assigned medieval order.
Explain, observe and guide.
Material prepared by the teacher.
Assessment Criteria
All children must be able to
• List the characteristics and privileges and duties of every medieval social order.
• Be able to explain the medieval economy and the peasants’ lifestyles.
• Describe a fief.
Most of the children will be able to
• Name the different status within the nobility, the Christian church and the medieval peasants.
Some of the children could
• Feel empathy for the terrible conditions of peasants.
• Understand the disequilibrium within the medieval society.
















Lesson 4

Learning objectives
Learning outcomes
Evidence for Assessment
Students will be able to learn how and why medieval cities, their economy and a new social class called bourgeoisie.
Students will be able to explain the causes of urban growth and the development of local (and the role of guilds) and international trade (and its trade routes).
Classroom observation.
Notebooks.
Draw of a guild’s pyramid.
List the street names linked to jobs from Burgos.
Draw on a Europe map the most important trading routes.
Discourse/Text targeted
Language targeted- Non-verbal L Targeted
Vocabulary: city, guild, guild hierarchy, High Middle Ages, excess cereals, freedom letters, city charter, bourgeoisie, city wall, emigration, rich bourgeoisie, merchant, banker, beggar, craftsman, trading route, Hansa, fair, local market, currency, north, south, west, east.
Verbal tenses: past simple, past perfect, passive.
Structures: cardinal and ordinal numbers. How to say years and centuries.
Body gestures to make understand the vocabulary and the actions.
Visual resources: images, maps, paintings, photographs.
Explanatory and instructive language.
Outline of leading activities
In today’s class, students will learn about the prosperity of farming and its more direct consequence: the birth of cities and a new social class, the bourgeoisie.
Classroom Management
Timing
Grouping
Pupils
Teacher
Resources
1’
Whole class
Talk about how they feel.
“Good morning everybody, how are you feeling this morning? Let’s go on this the Middle Ages!”

5’
Pair work
Review in pairs the vocabulary that has been learnt till so far in the unit. They will ask for a definition of a word, or provide the definition in order to get its concept.
Observe and check.
Textbook.
Notebook.
Mediators.
10’
Whole class
Read the pages of the book about medieval economy, birth of cities and trading routes.
Observe and check. Guide.
Textbook.
10’
Whole class
Listen and make questions.
Explain the new order the medieval society and explain the important role of bourgeoisie and the consequences of its appearance.
Blackboard.
Pictures.

12’
Pair work
Read the text provided by the teacher about the guilds. Write its main characteristics and, following the instructions about how to build a pyramid of the medieval society, draw a pyramid showing the rigid guild system.
Observe and guide.
Material prepared by the teacher.

12’
Groups of four
Using computers, students have to list all the streets named after jobs (because in medieval times that’s how merchants and craftsmen used to set).
Observe and guide.
www.maps.google.es

10’
Individual work
Having a map of Europe, students have to draw and name the four more important trading routes.
Observe and guide.
Material prepared by the teacher. Textbook.
Assessment Criteria
All children must be able to
• Explain the importance of bourgeoisie.
• Draw a pyramid that explains the hierarchy within the guilds.
• Name and draw the main trading routes in Europe.
Most of the children will be able to
• Explain why the nobility was unhappy with the birth of the cities and their citizens.
• Remember the different types of bourgeoisie.
Some of the children could
• Remember the main harbours and the products sold in the most important trading routes in Europe.
















Lesson 5

Learning objectives
Learning outcomes
Evidence for Assessment
Students will be able to learn the medieval political institutions within Europe.
Students will be able to understand the two most important European political institutions: Papacy and the Empire; and, the local institutions.
Classroom observation.
Notebooks.
Replay a conceptual map about medieval political institution and about economy and society, as a basic summary.
Discourse/Text targeted
Language targeted- Non-verbal L Targeted
Vocabulary: Kingdom, Papacy, the Pope, cardinals, archbishops, bishops, parish priests, Papal States, excommunication, interdict, inquisition, heresy, emperor, Holy Roman Empire, theocracy, common law, village policing, feudal parliament, curia, French Estates General, council of nobility, town government.
Verbal tenses: past simple, past perfect, passive.
Structures: cardinal and ordinal numbers. How to say years and centuries.
Body gestures to make understand the vocabulary and the actions.
Visual resources: images, maps, paintings, photographs.
Explanatory and instructive language.
Outline of leading activities
Students will read the pages in the textbook that explain the European context in 1300. The teacher will explain the common political institutions around Europe and later, explain the two main powers in Middle Ages: Papacy and Holy Roman Empire. After that, students will watch a video about the importance of Catholic Church at that time and later they will make a conceptual map about the political and religious institutions in the Middle Ages.
Classroom Management
Timing
Grouping
Pupils
Teacher
Resources
1’
Whole class
Talk about how they feel.
“Good morning everybody, how are you feeling this morning? Let’s go on with the Middle Ages!”

10’
Whole class
Read the pages of the textbook explaining this topic.
Observe and guide.
Textbook.
10’
Whole class
Listen, take notes and ask.
Explain Europe from a political point of view, listing the kingdoms and their political institutions.
Map.
Blackboard.
5’
Individual work
Draw a map of Europe and locate the kingdoms list by the teacher.
Observe and guide.
Map.
Blackboard.
Textbook.
10’
Whole class
Listen, take notes and ask.
Explain the importance of Papacy and the influence of Christian religion, Catholicism, in the medieval society.
Textbook. Blackboard.

12’
Whole class
Watch the video, take notes and ask questions.
Play the video and explain if it is needed.
Wikispace.

15’
Individual work
Students have to make a conceptual map about the political and religious institutions in the Middle Ages.
Observe, guide and check.
Textbook.
Notebook.
Video.
Assessment Criteria
All children must be able to
• List the two main political institutions: Papacy and Holy Roman Empire.
• Define the city government institutions.
• Explain the importance of Catholic Church in Medieval ages.
Most of the children will be able to
• Remember Catholic Church hierarchy.
• Draw the European political situation in 1300.
Some of the children could
• Understand the reasons of medieval people to be very religious.
















Lesson 6

Learning objectives
Learning outcomes
Evidence for Assessment
Students will be able to learn the greatest crisis in Middle Ages in 14th century: religious, political, social and demography crisis.
Students will be able to explain the reasons that caused the 14th century’s crisis.
Students will make a summary about the causes of the crisis and they will comment a fragment of Giovanni Boccaccio’s Decameron.
Discourse/Text targeted
Language targeted- Non-verbal L Targeted
Vocabulary: Low Middle Ages, Western Schism, Council of Constance, Hundred’s Years War, world war, civil wars, popular revolt, malnutrition, Great famine, black death, little ice age, inflation, standard of living, witchcraft.
Verbal tenses: past simple, past perfect, passive.
Structures: cardinal and ordinal numbers. How to say years and centuries.
Body gestures to make understand the vocabulary and the actions.
Visual resources: images, maps, paintings, photographs.
Explanatory and instructive language.
Outline of leading activities
Today’s class will be about the two last centuries of Middle Ages, 14th and 15th. The main focus will be on the 14th century’s crisis and their causes. Students will watch a video to understand the crisis context at the time, especially provoked by the black death. After, students will be able to list and explain these cause and they will comment a fragment of Boccaccio’s Decameron.
Classroom Management
Timing
Grouping
Pupils
Teacher
Resources
2’
Whole class
Talk about how they feel.
“Good morning. In today’s class we are going to explain the two last centuries of Middle Ages. We are going to explain the inherent crisis in 14th century and the social slow recovery in 15th century. Do you have questions till so far?

8’
Whole class
Read the pages of the textbook explaining this topic.
Observe and guide.
Textbook.
10’
Whole class
Listen, take notes and ask.
List and explain the reasons that caused the awful 14th century crisis: religious, political, social and demography.
Textbook.
Blackboard.
10’
Pair work
List the crisis that shake 14th century and write their causes. Introduce the slow recovery of Europe in 15th century.
Observe and check.
Textbook.
Blackboard.
20’
Whole class
Watch and take notes.
Play the video about Black Death.
Video from the wikispace
10’
Individual work
Comment and answer questions about a fragment from Giovanni Boccaccio’s Decameron, to understand more deeply the terrible Black Death.
Observe, guide and check.
Material provided by the teacher.
Assessment Criteria
All children must be able to
• Understand and explain the crisis of 14th century and their causes.
• Know the slow recovery produced in 15th century.
Most of the children will be able to
• Understand the huge impact of Hundred Year’s War in the 14th century.
• Know how black death spread so quickly.
Some of the children could
• Remember the kings names, the dates and the nations involved in the Hundred Year’s War.